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Training #3 Homework 1

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1 Training #3 Homework 1 on January 10th 2014, 2:03 pm

Please review the Safety sheet and Child Abuse packet from the April 8th training.
 
Safety: Safety is the #1 most important thing to always be mindful of while caring for chidlren. Parents are entrusting you with their most prized possession and want to make sure you are capable in handling any safety issues that may arise during the day. Please review this form to refresh your memories on practical ways to ensure safety at all times. Although you will never be able to prevent 100% of injuries, this form can help you greatly reduce many potential injuries.
 
Child Abuse: There may be a time during the summer that you interact with a camper that is showing signs of child abuse. This is a very serious issue that needs to be brought to the attention of the Director immediately.
 


 
You have the option to comment on either the Safety or Child Abuse information. When commenting on:

Safety: Discuss your personal plan of preventing injury. How will you work with your other staffers to keep the environment safe on a daily basis?What has worked well in the past? What new tips has this sheet given you to try for the summer?

Child Abuse: Without going into specifics (Child Abuse cases are strictly confidential) have you ever had to deal with a child you suspected or reported on child abuse? What were your emotions going through this situation? What piece of advice do you have for a staffer this summer that may experience this situation for the first time? How has the situation impacted your life?

After replying, please comment on 2 other fellow staffers' posts. Do you agree or disagree with them? Can you give them any advice for the future?


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2 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 9th 2014, 10:09 pm

The first safety measure I will take, is to create a list of 10 general rules that the campers will follow on a daily basis.  These rules will be posted in several locations throughout the camp and will also be reviewed daily to ensure that all campers know what is expected of them.  I will also work with my staff to establish routines and procedures to keep the camp running as smoothly as possible.  Routines will help to eliminate down time for accidents to happen.  When the first staffer arrives in the morning it will be vital for them to take a walk through and make sure there is nothing dangerous laying around or in the way for the campers to get hurt on.  It will be very important to go over safety issues and rules when teaching campers a new game. Staff should make sure to enforce these rules so that campers can participate in the games safely.  One tip that I liked that was on the sheet was having the campers help in creating a list of safety rules and really engaging them when reviewing the rules.  I would like to talk to my staff about implementing this at our site during the summer.

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3 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 11th 2014, 12:31 pm

While we want to maximize the fun component of camp, the most important thing to take into consideration is safety. The first thing I would do to create a safe environment is to have a few rules posted on a poster. Every day, I would go over these rules with the kids, so they understand how important safety is. These rules would include boundaries of where kids are allowed to go, instructions on how they are supposed to listen to counselors instructions, and general safety information like “keep your hands to yourself”. Also, before every new game we play, I would introduce safety rules. For instance, capture the flag would have different safety concerns (no shoving) than would a game of 4 square (don't spike the ball). Enforcing rules also goes along with safety. If we are lax on “smaller” rules, the kids will not be as inclined to listen to the “bigger”, more important rules. I liked what the safety sheet said about being aware of the environment. I will be sure to scan the area we are going to be around daily for safety concerns like bottles, paper clips, or anything that could be a hazard.

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4 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 11th 2014, 12:33 pm

dallasmavs134140 wrote:The first safety measure I will take, is to create a list of 10 general rules that the campers will follow on a daily basis.  These rules will be posted in several locations throughout the camp and will also be reviewed daily to ensure that all campers know what is expected of them.  I will also work with my staff to establish routines and procedures to keep the camp running as smoothly as possible.  Routines will help to eliminate down time for accidents to happen.  When the first staffer arrives in the morning it will be vital for them to take a walk through and make sure there is nothing dangerous laying around or in the way for the campers to get hurt on.  It will be very important to go over safety issues and rules when teaching campers a new game. Staff should make sure to enforce these rules so that campers can participate in the games safely.  One tip that I liked that was on the sheet was having the campers help in creating a list of safety rules and really engaging them when reviewing the rules.  I would like to talk to my staff about implementing this at our site during the summer.

I like your idea of putting the "10 safety rules" up at multiple locations around the site. I definitely think that is a great idea, instead of just having it up in one location (like the multipurpose room). It wouldn't be much trouble to make multiple copies, and it is worth it so kids are reminded of what is expected of them!

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5 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 11th 2014, 1:58 pm

I've found that establishing a set of rules on day one is a good first step in preventing injury. Typical rules such as no running inside or no hitting, may be 'forgotten' during the summertime. Also, having the kids give their input on the rules works wonders; they are often more strict than we are! In order to remind the campers of our rules, I would like to have a big poster board of the rules sitting out where all the children and parents can see it. Also, going over the rules every day is a good way to instill in the children what is expected of them. Another way to manage safety would be to have a staff member assess any room for potential issue, like a table or a carpet sticking up, before the children enter the area for an activity. Risk management is something to focus on when introducing new or well-known games to the campers. The rules for the game need to be established and explained before the game begins and consequences need to be set for breaking those rules, for example if you shove or throw a ball at someone's face you're out. Something from the packet that I think would be a good strategy is assigning a group of campers to a staff member for the day or even week. That way, one staff member is constantly keeping an eye on a smaller group rather than trying to watch everyone at all times. A big part of keeping the campers and yourself safe is being aware of your surroundings. It is our responsibility to keep these kids safe and by working as a team with staff and campers we should be able to minimize any injuries that might occur due to negligence.

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6 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 13th 2014, 3:40 pm

When the children are under my supervision we will go over the rules and why each rule in place. This will occur every time I see the children, since I will only be sing them once a week. We will go through how to use supplies I am given appropriately, so they dont get ruined. I will put cone for boundaries when I am outside. Children will then know what is out of bounce, which was a new tip for me. The way I am going to prevent injury is by going through the rules of soccer and what my objectives are that day at your camp site. Soccer is a straight forward game for younger children. Accidents do happen it comes along with playing the sport. I will let the kids know this. I will make sure the children are not getting physical while playing. This should help minimize the injuries and accidents.

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7 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 14th 2014, 12:04 am

I really like your idea about posting the rules at various places around the site. Often times when a child breaks a rule it is because he/she was in the moment and simply forgot. By posting the rules and expectations in high frequency areas, I think that we can provide helpful reminders to the children without constantly having to remind them of the rules. I also saw that you emphasized routine in your safety plan for the site. I think that this is a critical area that often gets overlooked when working with children. Obviously we have to have a component of spontaneity to our daily activities to maintain the interest of the kids. However, maintaining a routine often provides a safer environment where kids can still have a great time. And a routine provides the opportunity for even more excitement when there's a new activity on the agenda.

dallasmavs134140 wrote:The first safety measure I will take, is to create a list of 10 general rules that the campers will follow on a daily basis.  These rules will be posted in several locations throughout the camp and will also be reviewed daily to ensure that all campers know what is expected of them.  I will also work with my staff to establish routines and procedures to keep the camp running as smoothly as possible.  Routines will help to eliminate down time for accidents to happen.  When the first staffer arrives in the morning it will be vital for them to take a walk through and make sure there is nothing dangerous laying around or in the way for the campers to get hurt on.  It will be very important to go over safety issues and rules when teaching campers a new game. Staff should make sure to enforce these rules so that campers can participate in the games safely.  One tip that I liked that was on the sheet was having the campers help in creating a list of safety rules and really engaging them when reviewing the rules.  I would like to talk to my staff about implementing this at our site during the summer.

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8 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 14th 2014, 12:10 am

I like how you mentioned enforcing rules big or small is important. Obviously this is a no brainer, as counselors we are responsible for setting and enforcing rules. Often though, it is easier to bend the rules a little for small things. At the time is might not seem like such a big deal, however like you said, how can we expect the kids to follow the bigger rules when the staff is lenient with smaller rules. This is something even I need to work on and that I hope to instill in my fellow coworkers this summer. Overall, the safety of the kids is the most important and maintaining a unified force, whether it be for large or small, will help us to have a fun, safe summer.

kellymags1 wrote:While we want to maximize the fun component of camp, the most important thing to take into consideration is safety. The first thing I would do to create a safe environment is to have a few rules posted on a poster. Every day, I would go over these rules with the kids, so they understand how important safety is. These rules would include boundaries of where kids are allowed to go, instructions on how they are supposed to listen to counselors instructions, and general safety information like “keep your hands to yourself”. Also, before every new game we play, I would introduce safety rules. For instance, capture the flag would have different safety concerns (no shoving) than would a game of 4 square (don't spike the ball). Enforcing rules also goes along with safety. If we are lax on “smaller” rules, the kids will not be as inclined to listen to the “bigger”, more important rules. I liked what the safety sheet said about being aware of the environment. I will be sure to scan the area we are going to be around daily for safety concerns like bottles, paper clips, or anything that could be a hazard.

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9 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 14th 2014, 8:58 pm

Working with your co-workers to come up with set rules for the kids will be a good idea because then all the staff will be on the same page. That will make it easier to enforce all the rules to the kids when all the staff knows what they are. When coming up with the rules we should write them on paper and hang them around the site so they are visible for the kids to see. Also I think every morning we should review the rules and go over where the materials that they will need for that day is, so they don’t go wondering for the material. What also might work is having the staff all organized and planned throughout the day, it won’t be so chaotic for the kids and they aren’t just waiting around for us to figure it out. If kids are just waiting around that could lead to injury because they are trying to keep themselves busy. Also something that works is always keeping them busy and active. Keeping them busy and active are less likely to get in to any kind of danger. This sheet gave me some good pointers. For example, when you see kids start getting too excited, angry, or tired, you should change the game. That means that the staff has to be on our toes because then we will have to come up with another game for them before they get to antsy. Help preventing injury for kids is the way to have a successful site.

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10 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 14th 2014, 9:13 pm

I agree with you, many kids in the summer forget about the typical rules like running and no hitting. So reinforcing those rules every day will help the kids know they are not allowed to do that. I also like how you have the kids input on the rules because getting their perspective on what they think is a good way to build relationships with them. Having the staff and kids aware of the surroundings is a good way to prevent injury. I also like how you mentioned that if they break a rule they will have a consequence because I know many kids think that in the summer even if they break a rule they don't think they will have a consequence. Teamwork with the staff and even with the kids is going to help prevent injury at your site and make the kids safe everyday.

cnewton1 wrote:I've found that establishing a set of rules on day one is a good first step in preventing injury. Typical rules such as no running inside or no hitting, may be 'forgotten' during the summertime. Also, having the kids give their input on the rules works wonders; they are often more strict than we are! In order to remind the campers of our rules, I would like to have a big poster board of the rules sitting out where all the children and parents can see it. Also, going over the rules every day is a good way to instill in the children what is expected of them. Another way to manage safety would be to have a staff member assess any room for potential issue, like a table or a carpet sticking up, before the children enter the area for an activity. Risk management is something to focus on when introducing new or well-known games to the campers. The rules for the game need to be established and explained before the game begins and consequences need to be set for breaking those rules, for example if you shove or throw a ball at someone's face you're out. Something from the packet that I think would be a good strategy is assigning a group of campers to a staff member for the day or even week. That way, one staff member is constantly keeping an eye on a smaller group rather than trying to watch everyone at all times. A big part of keeping the campers and yourself safe is being aware of your surroundings. It is our responsibility to keep these kids safe and by working as a team with staff and campers we should be able to minimize any injuries that might occur due to negligence.

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11 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 14th 2014, 9:19 pm

I like how you are going to post the rules in multiple locations because then if the kids breaks a rule you can be like well the rule is written right in front of you or something like that. I agree having procedures will help your site run smooth and help prevent some injuries. Also I agree having the kids input on some of the rules will help with everyone getting along and the staff and kids all being on the same page when it comes to rules. When the staff and kids understand the safety it will help prevent injury at that site. I also agree with going over the safety issues for that game will help the kids understand that they can't do that because they will get injured. Working together with your staff will help your site be successful with preventing injuries.

dallasmavs134140 wrote:The first safety measure I will take, is to create a list of 10 general rules that the campers will follow on a daily basis.  These rules will be posted in several locations throughout the camp and will also be reviewed daily to ensure that all campers know what is expected of them.  I will also work with my staff to establish routines and procedures to keep the camp running as smoothly as possible.  Routines will help to eliminate down time for accidents to happen.  When the first staffer arrives in the morning it will be vital for them to take a walk through and make sure there is nothing dangerous laying around or in the way for the campers to get hurt on.  It will be very important to go over safety issues and rules when teaching campers a new game. Staff should make sure to enforce these rules so that campers can participate in the games safely.  One tip that I liked that was on the sheet was having the campers help in creating a list of safety rules and really engaging them when reviewing the rules.  I would like to talk to my staff about implementing this at our site during the summer.

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12 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 12:25 am

I think the biggest safety measure we can take is to create rules that we expect the campers to follow, and follow through with enforcing them. Accidents happen, especially when it comes to younger kids, but creating rules and instilling them in each child's mind will cut back on many of them. Rules such as "no running" will automatically cut down on the number of injuries because if kids aren't running, it is less likely for them to fall and hurt themselves or fall into another camper and hurt them. Going off of this, we have to be sure that all campers and staff members know all of the rules and are always aware of them. Reading the rules daily and posting them around them camp not only will remind the campers what they can and can't do, but will also remind them that the rules apply everywhere, not just inside or in one specific location. I think there are a lot of instances where kids think rules suddenly no longer apply when they are at the park, or on the playground, or in a gym, when those locations are actually where these rules become even more important.

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13 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 12:28 am

cnewton1 wrote:I've found that establishing a set of rules on day one is a good first step in preventing injury. Typical rules such as no running inside or no hitting, may be 'forgotten' during the summertime. Also, having the kids give their input on the rules works wonders; they are often more strict than we are! In order to remind the campers of our rules, I would like to have a big poster board of the rules sitting out where all the children and parents can see it. Also, going over the rules every day is a good way to instill in the children what is expected of them. Another way to manage safety would be to have a staff member assess any room for potential issue, like a table or a carpet sticking up, before the children enter the area for an activity. Risk management is something to focus on when introducing new or well-known games to the campers. The rules for the game need to be established and explained before the game begins and consequences need to be set for breaking those rules, for example if you shove or throw a ball at someone's face you're out. Something from the packet that I think would be a good strategy is assigning a group of campers to a staff member for the day or even week. That way, one staff member is constantly keeping an eye on a smaller group rather than trying to watch everyone at all times. A big part of keeping the campers and yourself safe is being aware of your surroundings. It is our responsibility to keep these kids safe and by working as a team with staff and campers we should be able to minimize any injuries that might occur due to negligence.

I really like your idea of campers helping create the list of rules! Not only are they pretty strict on themselves, but if they are helping create it, they are probably more likely to remember the rule.

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14 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 12:36 am

dallasmavs134140 wrote:The first safety measure I will take, is to create a list of 10 general rules that the campers will follow on a daily basis.  These rules will be posted in several locations throughout the camp and will also be reviewed daily to ensure that all campers know what is expected of them.  I will also work with my staff to establish routines and procedures to keep the camp running as smoothly as possible.  Routines will help to eliminate down time for accidents to happen.  When the first staffer arrives in the morning it will be vital for them to take a walk through and make sure there is nothing dangerous laying around or in the way for the campers to get hurt on.  It will be very important to go over safety issues and rules when teaching campers a new game. Staff should make sure to enforce these rules so that campers can participate in the games safely.  One tip that I liked that was on the sheet was having the campers help in creating a list of safety rules and really engaging them when reviewing the rules.  I would like to talk to my staff about implementing this at our site during the summer.

Keeping a routine is a great idea of how to prevent injury! It seems like a lot of the time, accidents occur when kids get bored and start goofing off because they are in a long transition from one activity or task to another. If they are constantly busy, they should be a little more focused and less accident prone (at least in that sense!).

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15 Safety and Injury Prevention on April 15th 2014, 11:20 am

The easiest and most efficient way to keep injuries from happening is by preventing them from happening in the first place. Injury prevention requires the constant supervision of all children. Taking your eyes off of any child for even 30 seconds could lead to a nose bleed, scrapes, a broken arm and worse. While not all causes of injuries are completely preventable, many of them are. When a staff members sees a child engaging in activity that could potentially become unsafe, it is their responsibility to immediately address the child. It is important when addressing the child that a staff member does not simply say "Don't do this or that" but is sure to explain to the child why their actions may be dangerous and how they could hurt themselves or someone else.
It is also a staff members responsibility to practice good safety. If you tell children not to run in the cafeteria, you should not run in the cafeteria either. This goes for just about any rule at your site but especially for safety rules.
As many have already stated, it is important to have clear rules in regards to safety and to go over these rules regularly.
Other measures mentioned in last week's training include following child to staff ratios, being mindful of what materials are accessible and their potential danger and going injury reports in order to identify common injuries and figure out ways to prevent them in the future.

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16 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 11:29 am

Your idea on posting rules in multiple places is great! It's hard for kids to keep the rules in mind if they're outside but the rules poster is posted somewhere in the cafeteria. Yesterday, we had a guest come into my early childhood class and teach a lesson on teaching/learning theories and such. She mentioned something interesting about rules that I never really thought about. Rather than making your rules "don't do..." or "no..." she mentioned making a list of "do's" So rather than posting one of the rules as "no running" maybe we could use the phrase " Walking is required in the cafeteria" or rather than "no pushing" we could say "Keep your hands to yourself and play nicely with others". Just a thought for when we are creating rules for our sites. I think that a list of "do's" rather than "don't do's" give children a better understanding of what it is that they do need to do in order to behave properly.

dallasmavs134140 wrote:The first safety measure I will take, is to create a list of 10 general rules that the campers will follow on a daily basis.  These rules will be posted in several locations throughout the camp and will also be reviewed daily to ensure that all campers know what is expected of them.  I will also work with my staff to establish routines and procedures to keep the camp running as smoothly as possible.  Routines will help to eliminate down time for accidents to happen.  When the first staffer arrives in the morning it will be vital for them to take a walk through and make sure there is nothing dangerous laying around or in the way for the campers to get hurt on.  It will be very important to go over safety issues and rules when teaching campers a new game. Staff should make sure to enforce these rules so that campers can participate in the games safely.  One tip that I liked that was on the sheet was having the campers help in creating a list of safety rules and really engaging them when reviewing the rules.  I would like to talk to my staff about implementing this at our site during the summer.

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17 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 12:50 pm

When it comes to safety it is important to strive to prevent it from occurring at all. I believe one way to do this is by always watching and supervising your campers. I think that rules need to be establish early so the children know what to do and what not to do. I would watch out for any dangerous or unsafe behavior and make sure that these behaviors are made clear in the rules that they should not occur. I also think that my fellow staffers and I can work together when it comes to preventing injuries because we would be able to watch more than just having one person watching at all times. We can also sit down and establish the rules together. When I am in my field placements I have learned that you always need to be watching because if you take your eye off of certain students for even a second they may act out and hurt someone else. You also need to learn how to calm them down and what works best for each child. I have found that preventing the problem is the best way to handle a situation. I really like the idea of having different staffers being responsible for certain activities and certain areas because by dividing up the responsibility for us as the staffers will help to keep us from becoming overwhelmed. It will also allow us to better see certain aspects because we know what we have to focus on and look for.

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18 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 12:53 pm

I really love this idea. I think that it is best to establish rules early and make them known to the kids. I think that children and staffers need routines because it helps things run smoothly. It also helps children know what to expect and that helps them feel more in control and comfortable with their environment. Children need to feel safe and if they know what to expect and what is expected from them so I think your ideas are awesome and will really help the children feel safe and make for a safer environment.

dallasmavs134140 wrote:The first safety measure I will take, is to create a list of 10 general rules that the campers will follow on a daily basis.  These rules will be posted in several locations throughout the camp and will also be reviewed daily to ensure that all campers know what is expected of them.  I will also work with my staff to establish routines and procedures to keep the camp running as smoothly as possible.  Routines will help to eliminate down time for accidents to happen.  When the first staffer arrives in the morning it will be vital for them to take a walk through and make sure there is nothing dangerous laying around or in the way for the campers to get hurt on.  It will be very important to go over safety issues and rules when teaching campers a new game. Staff should make sure to enforce these rules so that campers can participate in the games safely.  One tip that I liked that was on the sheet was having the campers help in creating a list of safety rules and really engaging them when reviewing the rules.  I would like to talk to my staff about implementing this at our site during the summer.

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19 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 12:56 pm

I love this idea. I think it is important to create rules for your campers to follow. You need to make them clear for the kids because clear and direct instruction makes sense to them and they will be more likely to follow the rules. I also like how you plan to place the rules everywhere and even take them with you on field trips to make sure that the kids know that the rules always apply. I think this is an awesome idea and will help to prevent injury.

kjenkins3 wrote:I think the biggest safety measure we can take is to create rules that we expect the campers to follow, and follow through with enforcing them. Accidents happen, especially when it comes to younger kids, but creating rules and instilling them in each child's mind will cut back on many of them. Rules such as "no running" will automatically cut down on the number of injuries because if kids aren't running, it is less likely for them to fall and hurt themselves or fall into another camper and hurt them. Going off of this, we have to be sure that all campers and staff members know all of the rules and are always aware of them. Reading the rules daily and posting them around them camp not only will remind the campers what they can and can't do, but will also remind them that the rules apply everywhere, not just inside or in one specific location. I think there are a lot of instances where kids think rules suddenly no longer apply when they are at the park, or on the playground, or in a gym, when those locations are actually where these rules become even more important.

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20 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 1:14 pm

My plan for preventing injuries this summer would be first to make a set of rules. If children know the basic rules that will already limit injuries. Also it would be effective to have safety guidelines posted on the walls and discuss these tips daily before the day starts. Repeating information like this, or asking a child to repeat this information to the group, is an effective way to help them remember things and follow these guidelines. I will work with other staffers to keep the environment safe by always knowing where the first aid kit is and always having it nearby. I think communication is important to keep within the staff about what to do in certain situations and if something does happen, staff must work together to keep campers calm during an injury and providing the best care possible. Something that has worked well in the past is talking with fellow staffers in the very beginning of camp to set up a plan, safety guidelines, and to check all first aid supplies (daily). This way, we are all on the same page and will know what to do if something happens. One tip I thought was helpful on the sheet was to have campers create guidelines with the staff. Many campers know what is right and wrong when it comes to safety so they can be a helpful tool to create the list.

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21 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 1:19 pm

I love your idea of dividing up the responsibilities of the staff members. We all have things that we are best at so this is a chance to really use your abilities to your advantage. It also helps to keep the camp more stress free and to keep things running smoothly. I also agree that certain kids need to be watched carefully. All teachers/staff members must have 'eyes in the back of their head'. Even if you look away for a second they will definitely notice and this is often where injuries occur.



Kmarz17 wrote:When it comes to safety it is important to strive to prevent it from occurring at all. I believe one way to do this is by always watching and supervising your campers. I think that rules need to be establish early so the children know what to do and what not to do. I would watch out for any dangerous or unsafe behavior and make sure that these behaviors are made clear in the rules that they should not occur. I also think that my fellow staffers and I can work together when it comes to preventing injuries because we would be able to watch more than just having one person watching at all times. We can also sit down and establish the rules together. When I am in my field placements I have learned that you always need to be watching because if you take your eye off of certain students for even a second they may act out and hurt someone else. You also need to learn how to calm them down and what works best for each child. I have found that preventing the problem is the best way to handle a situation. I really like the idea of having different staffers being responsible for certain activities and certain areas because by dividing up the responsibility for us as the staffers will help to keep us from becoming overwhelmed. It will also allow us to better see certain aspects because we know what we have to focus on and look for.

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22 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 1:28 pm

I really agree with your ideas about safety. I feel like kids always need to be told what they were doing wrong or how they can fix it instead of being told 'stop don't do that'. They will not understand what that means and most likely will continue to do it. I also love what you said about staff members being safe. Kids mimic everything they see, especially what adults do. If they see you doing something that is unsafe, it will occur to them that it is okay to do as well. We have to remember we are role models for all the kids so we should model what we expect from them.


svaughan2 wrote:The easiest and most efficient way to keep injuries from happening is by preventing them from happening in the first place. Injury prevention requires the constant supervision of all children. Taking your eyes off of any child for even 30 seconds could lead to a nose bleed, scrapes, a broken arm and worse. While not all causes of injuries are completely preventable, many of them are. When a staff members sees a child engaging in activity that could potentially become unsafe, it is their responsibility to immediately address the child. It is important when addressing the child that a staff member does not simply say "Don't do this or that" but is sure to explain to the child why their actions may be dangerous and how they could hurt themselves or someone else.
It is also a staff members responsibility to practice good safety. If you tell children not to run in the cafeteria, you should not run in the cafeteria either. This goes for just about any rule at your site but especially for safety rules.
As many have already stated, it is important to have clear rules in regards to safety and to go over these rules regularly.
Other measures mentioned in last week's training include following child to staff ratios, being mindful of what materials are accessible and their potential danger and going injury reports in order to identify common injuries and figure out ways to prevent them in the future.

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23 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 1:50 pm


Saftey
As counselors, are most important job is to prevent injury and stay aware of the surroundings at all time. I agree with what many others have stated, it is important to establish the site rules at the very beginning of the summer. Last summer at Fruitland we created a huge banner with some basic rules and we even had some of the older campers come up each day and read them. That made the campers feel special because they were involved but it also ingrained all of the rules into their heads. Simple rules such as no running unless you are in the gym or outside are often forgotten in the heat of the moment. However, as counselors it is our job to go out of the way and stop each child who runs because if you let it get away this is when an injury is bound to occur. One camper always wanted to run last summer and it got to the point that when we would say his name he would know it was because he was running. While its a monotonous job it is well worth it. Another thing that I think falls under safety is water. Some of the summer days get really hot and I think it is essential to make sure that each camper brings their water outside or gets water from a water fountain when coming back inside. Doing this will prevent any heat related or dehydration issues. It is important that all counselors are on the same page when it comes to preventing injury because this is the best way to keep the environment safe on a daily basis. An example of this would be when everyone goes outside. Last summer we would have some counselors playing games with campers and others would sit in the shade with the rest of the campers. I think it is essential to have counselors wherever campers are because even if they seem to be relaxing under the shade, anything could happen without a counselor. When reading this sheet I have thought about how we could differently explain the site rules this summer. It talks about why the rules are in place and what happens if they are violated. Instead of just reading "no running in the cafeteria" as counselors we could ask the campers why they think that is a rule. Since there are many answers the more the merrier, I think this will help them gain a better understating of the rule and why it is so important.

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24 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 1:52 pm

I've never had a case of child abuse as a college instructor, but it did have a student I was concerned about as far as self harm goes. It was such a heartbreaking experience for me, because I had grown to know and care about this student very much. Finding out they were harming themselves was hard on me as an educator because I wanted so badly to help, but we are only allowed to report the issue to counseling services on the campus. The situation proved to me that we are on the front line of helping our kids--we are just another voice that can and should speak for them

My advice is if you suspect a use, you should contact your superior immediately. never confront the child or the parent, because a) it will cause the kid to shut down and b) if your accusation is incorrect, will cause issues with the parent.

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25 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 1:55 pm

This is so important: establish a clear set of rules. Kids require structure and if they understand the rules, it gives them a sense of this structure. Making the rules easy to understand and follow is vital because if they do not understand, they will not be able to follow the rules. Safety is the most important element of child care and rules help establish this purpose.


bsapp1 wrote:My plan for preventing injuries this summer would be first to make a set of rules. If children know the basic rules that will already limit injuries. Also it would be effective to have safety guidelines posted on the walls and discuss these tips daily before the day starts. Repeating information like this, or asking a child to repeat this information to the group, is an effective way to help them remember things and follow these guidelines. I will work with other staffers to keep the environment safe by always knowing where the first aid kit is and always having it nearby. I think communication is important to keep within the staff about what to do in certain situations and if something does happen, staff must work together to keep campers calm during an injury and providing the best care possible. Something that has worked well in the past is talking with fellow staffers in the very beginning of camp to set up a plan, safety guidelines, and to check all first aid supplies (daily). This way, we are all on the same page and will know what to do if something happens. One tip I thought was helpful on the sheet was to have campers create guidelines with the staff. Many campers know what is right and wrong when it comes to safety so they can be a helpful tool to create the list.

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26 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 1:59 pm

Preventive planning is key. Rather than wait for an injury to occur to establish rules, it is good to create and enforce them prior to any incidents. I think your point about counselors being constantly aware of their surroundings is vital. It shows that you are in the moment and that you care about your students. Being aware means you can spot any issues before they arise.

Kmarz17 wrote:When it comes to safety it is important to strive to prevent it from occurring at all. I believe one way to do this is by always watching and supervising your campers. I think that rules need to be establish early so the children know what to do and what not to do. I would watch out for any dangerous or unsafe behavior and make sure that these behaviors are made clear in the rules that they should not occur. I also think that my fellow staffers and I can work together when it comes to preventing injuries because we would be able to watch more than just having one person watching at all times. We can also sit down and establish the rules together. When I am in my field placements I have learned that you always need to be watching because if you take your eye off of certain students for even a second they may act out and hurt someone else. You also need to learn how to calm them down and what works best for each child. I have found that preventing the problem is the best way to handle a situation. I really like the idea of having different staffers being responsible for certain activities and certain areas because by dividing up the responsibility for us as the staffers will help to keep us from becoming overwhelmed. It will also allow us to better see certain aspects because we know what we have to focus on and look for.

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27 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 2:03 pm

I really liked how you talked about preventing the problem. Sometimes this takes some extra work, but it is worth it every time. If you can prevent the problem ahead of time then it can save you from camper injuries, acting out, etc. I agree that dividing up the responsibilities can help the site to function a lot more smoothly for the counselors and campers. One counselor does not need to become overwhelmed because they are trying to manage everything when specific areas can be focused on by a specific counselor.

Kmarz17 wrote:When it comes to safety it is important to strive to prevent it from occurring at all. I believe one way to do this is by always watching and supervising your campers. I think that rules need to be establish early so the children know what to do and what not to do. I would watch out for any dangerous or unsafe behavior and make sure that these behaviors are made clear in the rules that they should not occur. I also think that my fellow staffers and I can work together when it comes to preventing injuries because we would be able to watch more than just having one person watching at all times. We can also sit down and establish the rules together. When I am in my field placements I have learned that you always need to be watching because if you take your eye off of certain students for even a second they may act out and hurt someone else. You also need to learn how to calm them down and what works best for each child. I have found that preventing the problem is the best way to handle a situation. I really like the idea of having different staffers being responsible for certain activities and certain areas because by dividing up the responsibility for us as the staffers will help to keep us from becoming overwhelmed. It will also allow us to better see certain aspects because we know what we have to focus on and look for.

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28 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 2:09 pm

I really like how you talk about having the campers give their input on the rules. What you said is so true! Campers are often harder on themselves than you would think. If they come up with the rules themselves then they have no reason to argue or disagree with them. I also agree that the placement of the rules is essential. If they are at a place where both the campers and parents can see them then there will be no confusion. If a camper breaks a rule they can even show their parent which rule the broke and explain how they broke it.

cnewton1 wrote:I've found that establishing a set of rules on day one is a good first step in preventing injury. Typical rules such as no running inside or no hitting, may be 'forgotten' during the summertime. Also, having the kids give their input on the rules works wonders; they are often more strict than we are! In order to remind the campers of our rules, I would like to have a big poster board of the rules sitting out where all the children and parents can see it. Also, going over the rules every day is a good way to instill in the children what is expected of them. Another way to manage safety would be to have a staff member assess any room for potential issue, like a table or a carpet sticking up, before the children enter the area for an activity. Risk management is something to focus on when introducing new or well-known games to the campers. The rules for the game need to be established and explained before the game begins and consequences need to be set for breaking those rules, for example if you shove or throw a ball at someone's face you're out. Something from the packet that I think would be a good strategy is assigning a group of campers to a staff member for the day or even week. That way, one staff member is constantly keeping an eye on a smaller group rather than trying to watch everyone at all times. A big part of keeping the campers and yourself safe is being aware of your surroundings. It is our responsibility to keep these kids safe and by working as a team with staff and campers we should be able to minimize any injuries that might occur due to negligence.

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29 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 2:23 pm

Safety is a very important element for summer camps. Parents relieve their children trusting that we provide exceptional care to them. The first step in preventing injuries is to create a list of rules that will guide the summer camp day to day. I think it will make the experience even better if the campers have a vital role in creating the list of rules; letting the campers create the rules also reinforces them to follow them since it should already be on their minds. Keeping a clean environment around the camp prevents injuries and makes it easier and clear to see when they may happen. Collaborating with my staff, we will create crafts and activities that are safe and fun. When explaining these activities, we need to go over and boundaries and safety precautions before we begin. Another thing to is to detect when campers are becoming irritated or otherwise overly excited. When these emotions arise, we need to deter and behaviors that may become an advert environment that is not needed in kids klub.

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30 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 2:27 pm

sekiefer wrote:I've never had a case of child abuse as a college instructor, but it did have a student I was concerned about as far as self harm goes. It was such a heartbreaking experience for me, because I had grown to know and care about this student very much. Finding out they were harming themselves was hard on me as an educator because I wanted so badly to help, but we are only allowed to report the issue to counseling services on the campus. The situation proved to me that we are on the front line of helping our kids--we are just another voice that can and should speak for them

My advice is if you suspect a use, you should contact your superior immediately. never confront the child or the parent, because a) it will cause the kid to shut down and b) if your accusation is incorrect, will cause issues with the parent.


I agree, it is definitely a sad situation to know that abuse is going on with a child. Whether it be self-harm or outwardly inflicted, the harm has some psychological effects. You did the right thing by contacting the authorities and reporting the situation. I think it is also vital to not contact the parent as it can prove to be a hostile situation.

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31 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 2:32 pm

kellymags1 wrote:While we want to maximize the fun component of camp, the most important thing to take into consideration is safety. The first thing I would do to create a safe environment is to have a few rules posted on a poster. Every day, I would go over these rules with the kids, so they understand how important safety is. These rules would include boundaries of where kids are allowed to go, instructions on how they are supposed to listen to counselors instructions, and general safety information like “keep your hands to yourself”. Also, before every new game we play, I would introduce safety rules. For instance, capture the flag would have different safety concerns (no shoving) than would a game of 4 square (don't spike the ball). Enforcing rules also goes along with safety. If we are lax on “smaller” rules, the kids will not be as inclined to listen to the “bigger”, more important rules. I liked what the safety sheet said about being aware of the environment. I will be sure to scan the area we are going to be around daily for safety concerns like bottles, paper clips, or anything that could be a hazard.

Going over rules every day is definitely key! I really like your point about making all rules equal. If we, as counselors, are relaxed on the small rules, then the campers will feel like they can bend the larger ones as well. Scanning the area is also really important, I think it is vital to keep the camp clean and tidy to help with our viewing areas.

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32 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 3:08 pm

Personal Plan of Safety

1. Never run, only walk, unless indicated and expressly given permission before a high activity game.
2. Encourage running only on flat soft ground like grass, never asphalt.
3. Take the first aid kit everywhere.
4. Actively engage in the high active games with the campers so you can adequately determine when it might be too hot, and time to switch to a low active activity.
5. Keep high active, low risk activities available, such as jump rope.
6. Encourage walking in line with “duck tails” hands behind your back, quiet, and to attention. Use walking chants as a means to focus them on staying in their line.
7. Create a list of rules together with the campers so that they feel they have a say in the rules to follow, and we all agree on them.
8. Routine checks of the environment. Checklist can be created with staff members at the site.
9. Act out important guidelines and rules like Stranger Danger, broken bones, fire drills, tornado warnings, etc. so that the campers are educated but it’s a fun learning experience.

My staffer members and I will work together on a daily basis to keep the environment safe with routine checks of the environment. These can be completed multiple times during the day: upon arrival and departure, during canteen, transitioning between activities. We will work together with the campers to create a list of rules we all agree should be followed.

There were a few new ideas presented in the text that I had not considered, such as how to handle runaways. I did not know that it was counterproductive to run after a runaway. I also had not considered any techniques for boarding a bus. I think when you get older you don’t realize how much you take common sense for granted. Working with kids requires a lot of advanced thought for situations like boarding a bus, making and enforcing rules, and giving directions. Giving action-last directions (learning to phrase directions by giving expectations first, instead of directions. For example if you say “choose a partner” first, they don’t hear anything else afterwards) is an acquired skill.

One question I still have that was not answered, and may be discussed later during training, is what are some appropriate and effective consequences for rule-breaking?

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33 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 3:11 pm

Safety is a very important component to have while working with children. While we want camp to be a fun environment, it is also extremely important that the kids are safe while having fun. The first thing to do is create a set of Kids Klub rules for all of the kids to follow. These rules should be reviewed every morning before activities. When children get hurt they tend to use the excuse that they did not know that, for example, running in the cafeteria was not a rule. By reviewing the rules each morning there will be no confusion with what kids can do and what they can't do. Therefore, the rules should be followed and understood. It is important to work with your kids klub staff, as well, by keeping a close watch on all of the kids. Yes, there may be a lot to watch and keep an eye on but if staff members spread out instead of all being in one area then all sections should be covered and injuries should be prevented. We also must be aware of the environment that the kids are in. If we see objects or situations that may be hazardous it might be a good idea to block it off and advise the children that they are not to go near there. It may need to be repeated to them a few times for them to listen and understand.

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34 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 3:14 pm

I agree with the rules portion of your reply. It is very important to enforce rules and to make sure that the children understand them. I think it is a very good idea to post the rules in more that one location so that the kids can see them all the time. That will lead to less confusion and misunderstanding when it comes to the rules that they need to follow.


dallasmavs134140 wrote:The first safety measure I will take, is to create a list of 10 general rules that the campers will follow on a daily basis.  These rules will be posted in several locations throughout the camp and will also be reviewed daily to ensure that all campers know what is expected of them.  I will also work with my staff to establish routines and procedures to keep the camp running as smoothly as possible.  Routines will help to eliminate down time for accidents to happen.  When the first staffer arrives in the morning it will be vital for them to take a walk through and make sure there is nothing dangerous laying around or in the way for the campers to get hurt on.  It will be very important to go over safety issues and rules when teaching campers a new game. Staff should make sure to enforce these rules so that campers can participate in the games safely.  One tip that I liked that was on the sheet was having the campers help in creating a list of safety rules and really engaging them when reviewing the rules.  I would like to talk to my staff about implementing this at our site during the summer.

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35 RE: on April 15th 2014, 3:18 pm

Absolutely! Parents must be comfortable and feel like their child is in a safe environment. Maybe it wouldn't hurt to put some "Safety first" signs up around the site, and some basic posters about procedures for the campers to follow. I really liked that the power point stressed that the definition of a good camp counselor is ambiguous and relative to who is being asked. I agree with the idea to have the campers help create the rules; I think it will be helpful when it is necessary to remind them ("You created your rules, you can't not follow your own rules").
I also agree with your statement to nip it in the bud if campers look like they are on the brink of a disagreement. Ultimately, things should never reach a physical level if we are able to intervene early on. I think the best thing to help us with that is to get to know the campers and figure out the chemistry of the group. This way we can plan activities that promote positive interaction.

shwnmard wrote:Safety is a very important element for summer camps. Parents relieve their children trusting that we provide exceptional care to them. The first step in preventing injuries is to create a list of rules that will guide the summer camp day to day. I think it will make the experience even better if the campers have a vital role in creating the list of rules; letting the campers create the rules also reinforces them to follow them since it should already be on their minds. Keeping a clean environment around the camp prevents injuries and makes it easier and clear to see when they may happen. Collaborating with my staff, we will create crafts and activities that are safe and fun. When explaining these activities, we need to go over and boundaries and safety precautions before we begin. Another thing to is to detect when campers are becoming irritated or otherwise overly excited. When these emotions arise, we need to deter and behaviors that may become an advert environment that is not needed in kids klub.

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36 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 3:19 pm

I have had one situation where it had to be reported. While it may have felt uncomfortable having to report a parent for abuse to their own child, you have to think about the child's safety and well-being. You may not want to cause tension or conflict by reporting abuse, but the child may really need your help in trying to put a stop to whatever may be going on in their life. It is kind of like how teachers used to tell us how to handle bullies in school. We were always taught to stick up for each other and stop bullying. We need to be a voice for our kids, as well.

sekiefer wrote:I've never had a case of child abuse as a college instructor, but it did have a student I was concerned about as far as self harm goes. It was such a heartbreaking experience for me, because I had grown to know and care about this student very much. Finding out they were harming themselves was hard on me as an educator because I wanted so badly to help, but we are only allowed to report the issue to counseling services on the campus. The situation proved to me that we are on the front line of helping our kids--we are just another voice that can and should speak for them

My advice is if you suspect a use, you should contact your superior immediately. never confront the child or the parent, because a) it will cause the kid to shut down and b) if your accusation is incorrect, will cause issues with the parent.

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37 RE: on April 15th 2014, 3:32 pm

Excellent point about scanning the environment for hazards. Kids can be distracted by the simplest of things. That paperclip, for example, they will unbend, and rebend over and over until it breaks, or they will keep it for a fun game of poking someone, it could also be dropped in the grass and later stepped on.
Even if we can keep the environment spotless, we have to make sure they're not a danger to themselves. So, another thing to watch out for would be loose sneaker laces.

kellymags1 wrote:While we want to maximize the fun component of camp, the most important thing to take into consideration is safety. The first thing I would do to create a safe environment is to have a few rules posted on a poster. Every day, I would go over these rules with the kids, so they understand how important safety is. These rules would include boundaries of where kids are allowed to go, instructions on how they are supposed to listen to counselors instructions, and general safety information like “keep your hands to yourself”. Also, before every new game we play, I would introduce safety rules. For instance, capture the flag would have different safety concerns (no shoving) than would a game of 4 square (don't spike the ball). Enforcing rules also goes along with safety. If we are lax on “smaller” rules, the kids will not be as inclined to listen to the “bigger”, more important rules. I liked what the safety sheet said about being aware of the environment. I will be sure to scan the area we are going to be around daily for safety concerns like bottles, paper clips, or anything that could be a hazard.

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38 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 4:10 pm

My plan for preventing injuries this summer is to have a set of safety rules that the other staffers and I have agreed on and go over them with the kids daily. Having a basic set of rules will allow the children to get used to them. I feel having posters of the rules written out and hung around the area will be a helpful reminder. As staff before any activity we should secure the environment and think of any possibly hazardous things that could be a danger to the kids and ourselves. Also, working together we need to organize activities where the kids can be constantly supervised. One aspect that the sheet reminded me of is that kids are more likely to get hurt and be careless when they are tired, over excited, or bored. The sheet provided tips on how to keep the kids entertained or to play less active games with them at these times.

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39 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 4:17 pm

I like the idea of having the kids be interactive with the safety rules. Having them repeat the rules to the group or somehow making a game or group activity using the rules is a good idea. Along with having the kids themselves come up with rules so they feel more apart and in control of their environment making them more likely to follow them.

bsapp1 wrote:My plan for preventing injuries this summer would be first to make a set of rules. If children know the basic rules that will already limit injuries. Also it would be effective to have safety guidelines posted on the walls and discuss these tips daily before the day starts. Repeating information like this, or asking a child to repeat this information to the group, is an effective way to help them remember things and follow these guidelines. I will work with other staffers to keep the environment safe by always knowing where the first aid kit is and always having it nearby. I think communication is important to keep within the staff about what to do in certain situations and if something does happen, staff must work together to keep campers calm during an injury and providing the best care possible. Something that has worked well in the past is talking with fellow staffers in the very beginning of camp to set up a plan, safety guidelines, and to check all first aid supplies (daily). This way, we are all on the same page and will know what to do if something happens. One tip I thought was helpful on the sheet was to have campers create guidelines with the staff. Many campers know what is right and wrong when it comes to safety so they can be a helpful tool to create the list.

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40 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 4:21 pm

I like the idea of the 10 general rules because it will be easier for the kids to remember then adjust or add to them depending on the different activities or environment. Eliminating downtime is also important as it is a time when kids become restless and act careless which can lead to injuries.


dallasmavs134140 wrote:The first safety measure I will take, is to create a list of 10 general rules that the campers will follow on a daily basis.  These rules will be posted in several locations throughout the camp and will also be reviewed daily to ensure that all campers know what is expected of them.  I will also work with my staff to establish routines and procedures to keep the camp running as smoothly as possible.  Routines will help to eliminate down time for accidents to happen.  When the first staffer arrives in the morning it will be vital for them to take a walk through and make sure there is nothing dangerous laying around or in the way for the campers to get hurt on.  It will be very important to go over safety issues and rules when teaching campers a new game. Staff should make sure to enforce these rules so that campers can participate in the games safely.  One tip that I liked that was on the sheet was having the campers help in creating a list of safety rules and really engaging them when reviewing the rules.  I would like to talk to my staff about implementing this at our site during the summer.

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41 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 5:06 pm

I think the most important thing for preventing injury and keeping children safe during the summer camp is to establish rules, and to be a good model of safety. On the first day of each week, I would go over a set of safety rules with the campers to make sure they all understand the rules, and to give them the opportunity to ask any questions about why certain rules exist. This way children will understand hat we as counselors have rules to keep them safe, not just to be strict. I would then make sure that I am always following the rules myself. For example, if the rule states to remain seated while the bus is in motion, I will not get out of my seat during the bus ride. Modeling the expected behavior will show the campers that everyone has to abide by the safety rules, therefore showing the children that the rules are valid and have a purpose. When campers do something unsafe, they should be reminded of the rules.

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42 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 5:08 pm

dallasmavs134140 wrote:The first safety measure I will take, is to create a list of 10 general rules that the campers will follow on a daily basis.  These rules will be posted in several locations throughout the camp and will also be reviewed daily to ensure that all campers know what is expected of them.  I will also work with my staff to establish routines and procedures to keep the camp running as smoothly as possible.  Routines will help to eliminate down time for accidents to happen.  When the first staffer arrives in the morning it will be vital for them to take a walk through and make sure there is nothing dangerous laying around or in the way for the campers to get hurt on.  It will be very important to go over safety issues and rules when teaching campers a new game. Staff should make sure to enforce these rules so that campers can participate in the games safely.  One tip that I liked that was on the sheet was having the campers help in creating a list of safety rules and really engaging them when reviewing the rules.  I would like to talk to my staff about implementing this at our site during the summer.

I really like the idea of 10 basic safely rules. It will be easy for kids, especially repeat campers, to remember what is expected of them. Going over the rules everyday is also a good idea because it reinforces the rule in the camper's minds.

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43 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 5:13 pm

bsapp1 wrote:My plan for preventing injuries this summer would be first to make a set of rules. If children know the basic rules that will already limit injuries. Also it would be effective to have safety guidelines posted on the walls and discuss these tips daily before the day starts. Repeating information like this, or asking a child to repeat this information to the group, is an effective way to help them remember things and follow these guidelines. I will work with other staffers to keep the environment safe by always knowing where the first aid kit is and always having it nearby. I think communication is important to keep within the staff about what to do in certain situations and if something does happen, staff must work together to keep campers calm during an injury and providing the best care possible. Something that has worked well in the past is talking with fellow staffers in the very beginning of camp to set up a plan, safety guidelines, and to check all first aid supplies (daily). This way, we are all on the same page and will know what to do if something happens. One tip I thought was helpful on the sheet was to have campers create guidelines with the staff. Many campers know what is right and wrong when it comes to safety so they can be a helpful tool to create the list.
I really like the idea of having campers create the guidelines and rules alongside the counselors. This will help the children understand that the rules are meant to be followed, and they won't have an excuse for not following the rules, because they helped make them up.

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44 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 5:34 pm

I like your suggestion of reminding the kids of the simple rules that they may not think of since it is summertime and not regular school. I also agree with you that going over the rules everyday is a good way to remind the children what is expected of them, this is especially important because we may not have the same kids everyday.


cnewton1 wrote:I've found that establishing a set of rules on day one is a good first step in preventing injury. Typical rules such as no running inside or no hitting, may be 'forgotten' during the summertime. Also, having the kids give their input on the rules works wonders; they are often more strict than we are! In order to remind the campers of our rules, I would like to have a big poster board of the rules sitting out where all the children and parents can see it. Also, going over the rules every day is a good way to instill in the children what is expected of them. Another way to manage safety would be to have a staff member assess any room for potential issue, like a table or a carpet sticking up, before the children enter the area for an activity. Risk management is something to focus on when introducing new or well-known games to the campers. The rules for the game need to be established and explained before the game begins and consequences need to be set for breaking those rules, for example if you shove or throw a ball at someone's face you're out. Something from the packet that I think would be a good strategy is assigning a group of campers to a staff member for the day or even week. That way, one staff member is constantly keeping an eye on a smaller group rather than trying to watch everyone at all times. A big part of keeping the campers and yourself safe is being aware of your surroundings. It is our responsibility to keep these kids safe and by working as a team with staff and campers we should be able to minimize any injuries that might occur due to negligence.

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45 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 5:42 pm

I really like what you said about the importance of creating rules and following through with enforcing them.  The same standard should be set for all campers.  Its sometimes very easy to play favorites and not punish someone as much as you would another person.  It is important the kids are aware of the consequences for not following the rules and sticking to the same punishment for all.


kjenkins3 wrote:I think the biggest safety measure we can take is to create rules that we expect the campers to follow, and follow through with enforcing them. Accidents happen, especially when it comes to younger kids, but creating rules and instilling them in each child's mind will cut back on many of them. Rules such as "no running" will automatically cut down on the number of injuries because if kids aren't running, it is less likely for them to fall and hurt themselves or fall into another camper and hurt them. Going off of this, we have to be sure that all campers and staff members know all of the rules and are always aware of them. Reading the rules daily and posting them around them camp not only will remind the campers what they can and can't do, but will also remind them that the rules apply everywhere, not just inside or in one specific location. I think there are a lot of instances where kids think rules suddenly no longer apply when they are at the park, or on the playground, or in a gym, when those locations are actually where these rules become even more important.

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46 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 6:11 pm

I believe safety is the one of the most important factors when working with kids in the summer camp. Without a set of rules the kids will run rampant and go crazy so the first thing I will do as a counselor is make set of rules. I have dealt with kids before so I know how they act and how to handle them. Having a set of rules and a little authority will let the kids know what they can and can't do. This can help with preventing injuries because with a set of rules and showing authority it will minimize the risk of injuries. Also getting to know the kids and their personalities will allow us to know who needs to be focused more on and help with. Not saying that we shouldn't keep an eye out for everyone but those who really need it should be monitored more. I know from past experiences if I am friendly and show the kids I care and am interested in them, as a whole they will be more respectful and easy going.

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47 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 6:26 pm

Kmarz17 wrote:When it comes to safety it is important to strive to prevent it from occurring at all. I believe one way to do this is by always watching and supervising your campers. I think that rules need to be establish early so the children know what to do and what not to do. I would watch out for any dangerous or unsafe behavior and make sure that these behaviors are made clear in the rules that they should not occur. I also think that my fellow staffers and I can work together when it comes to preventing injuries because we would be able to watch more than just having one person watching at all times. We can also sit down and establish the rules together. When I am in my field placements I have learned that you always need to be watching because if you take your eye off of certain students for even a second they may act out and hurt someone else. You also need to learn how to calm them down and what works best for each child. I have found that preventing the problem is the best way to handle a situation. I really like the idea of having different staffers being responsible for certain activities and certain areas because by dividing up the responsibility for us as the staffers will help to keep us from becoming overwhelmed. It will also allow us to better see certain aspects because we know what we have to focus on and look for.

You make a good point about having multiple staff members available to watch the kids. A lot of times the misbehaving happens when the teacher turns their back to on set of students. I think it is important to locate yourself in an area were you can see every child. This will prevent injuries and mishaps.

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48 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on April 15th 2014, 6:30 pm

Hbutts1 wrote:I think the most important thing for preventing injury and keeping children safe during the summer camp is to establish rules, and to be a good model of safety. On the first day of each week, I would go over a set of safety rules with the campers to make sure they all understand the rules, and to give them the opportunity to ask any questions about why certain rules exist. This way children will understand hat we as counselors have rules to keep them safe, not just to be strict. I would then make sure that I am always following the rules myself. For example, if the rule states to remain seated while the bus is in motion, I will not get out of my seat during the bus ride. Modeling the expected behavior will show the campers that everyone has to abide by the safety rules, therefore showing the children that the rules are valid and have a purpose. When campers do something unsafe, they should be reminded of the rules.

I believe modeling is important for children to see. They learn the best when they see there elders or the individuals they look up to doing the correct thing. If a child does something wrong you could ask them to model the correct behavior. I agree modeling is important to preventing injuries.

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49 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on May 12th 2014, 8:57 pm

One way to prevent injuries at the campsites is to establish ground rules and expectations of the campers. Creating a list of general safety rules and going over them on the first day, would be beneficial to the campers. Arriving a few minutes early to inspect your campsite for hazardous items/things that can cause injuries is another way to ensure safety at your campsite. As I work with the campers this summer and interact through arts and crafts, I can make sure I remind the campers how to properly hold/carry the supplies. I also think that informing the campers what to do if they get injured and the plan of action they should take would be beneficial. In my education courses we have also been discussing how to address safety issues in a more polite way. Instead of saying “stop/do not run” you could say “please walk” or something like “In the buildings we walk to our destination.” Just try and use a more positive tone to address discipline issues that could cause injuries.

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50 Re: Training #3 Homework 1 on May 12th 2014, 9:04 pm

kjenkins3 wrote:I think the biggest safety measure we can take is to create rules that we expect the campers to follow, and follow through with enforcing them. Accidents happen, especially when it comes to younger kids, but creating rules and instilling them in each child's mind will cut back on many of them. Rules such as "no running" will automatically cut down on the number of injuries because if kids aren't running, it is less likely for them to fall and hurt themselves or fall into another camper and hurt them. Going off of this, we have to be sure that all campers and staff members know all of the rules and are always aware of them. Reading the rules daily and posting them around them camp not only will remind the campers what they can and can't do, but will also remind them that the rules apply everywhere, not just inside or in one specific location. I think there are a lot of instances where kids think rules suddenly no longer apply when they are at the park, or on the playground, or in a gym, when those locations are actually where these rules become even more important.

I totally agree with your last sentence! Majority of the campers probably assume that the rules are only in action while inside. On the first day of camp, I think it would be a good idea to set rules for not only indoor activities but also ones outside.

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